UN to set resilience goals

1st April 2015


Related Topics

Related tags

  • Adaptation

Author

Catherine Retberg

The post-2015 sustainable development goals that are due to be adopted in September will include targets to reduce the risk for loss of life, livelihood and critical infrastructure from disasters.

It follows the agreement struck on disaster risk reduction at a UN conference in Sendai, Japan.

The framework calls for actions to protect populations and promote quick recovery, as well as prevent new risks, such as those caused by ill-planned urban growth in areas subject to flooding, landslides and effects of climate change.

“The adoption of the framework for disaster risk reduction opens a major new chapter in sustainable development as it outlines clear targets and priorities for action which will lead to a substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihood and health,” said Margareta Wahlström, head of the UN office for disaster risk reduction.

The document warns that disasters, many of which are exacerbated by climate change and are increasing in frequency and intensity, significantly impede progress towards sustainable development. It calls for more dedicated action on tackling underlying disaster risk drivers, such as the consequences of climate change, unplanned and rapid urbanisation, poor land management, complex supply chains, unsustainable use of natural resources and declining ecosystems. “Addressing climate change represents an opportunity to reduce disaster risk in a meaningful and coherent manner,” states the agreement.It also advises governments to strengthen the sustainable use and management of ecosystems, and to implement integrated environmental and natural resource management approaches that incorporate disaster risk reduction.

The Sendai accord replaces the 2005 Hyogo framework for action. The UN said Hyogo had helped to reduce disaster risk at local, national, regional and global levels, but conceded that, over the past 10 years, disasters had continued to exact a heavy toll. Since 2005, disasters had resulted in more than 700,000 people losing their lives, with approximately 23 million being made homeless, it said. Overall, more than 1.5 billion people had been affected by disasters in various ways during the past decade, with total economic losses estimated at more than $1.3 trillion.


Transform articles

IEMA reacts to UK government's Net Zero Strategy

IEMA has raised concerns around a lack of funding for proposals outlined in the UK government's Net Zero Strategy, which was published earlier this week.

21st October 2021

Read more

Demand for fossil fuels will peak by 2025 if all national net-zero pledges are implemented in full and on time, the International Energy Agency (IEA) has forecast.

15th October 2021

Read more

Climate change remains one of the top issues most concerning the UK public, despite the economic turmoil experienced over the last 18 months, a poll commissioned by IEMA has found.

15th October 2021

Read more

Almost one-third of Europe's largest companies have now set net-zero emissions targets, but far less are set to deliver on their ambitions.

7th October 2021

Read more

A group of world-leading climate scientists has today warned that carbon pricing is currently too low to deliver a just transition to a net-zero economy, and that "urgent reforms" are needed.

30th September 2021

Read more

The Royal Botanic Gardens (RBG) in Kew has today unveiled a new strategy to tackle biodiversity loss and develop sustainable nature-based solutions to some of humanity’s biggest global challenges.

28th September 2021

Read more

How to Save Our Planet is call to action that aims to equip everyone with the knowledge needed to make change. We need to deal with climate change, environmental destruction and global poverty, and ensure everyone’s security.

23rd September 2021

Read more

Hannah Lesbirel and Beccy Wilson speak to IEMA members about climate anxiety

23rd September 2021

Read more

Seven of the UK's 17 key industry sectors are still increasing their emissions year-on-year, and most will miss their 2050 net-zero targets without significant government action, new research suggests.

23rd September 2021

Read more

Media enquires

Looking for an expert to speak at an event or comment on an item in the news?

Find an expert