Mind the gap

30th April 2015


Istock 000025868284 lar fmt

Related Topics

Related tags

  • Management ,
  • Certification ,
  • Business & Industry

Author

Claire Hicks

Marek Bidwell outlines a process to plot the differences between the old and new version of the 14001 standard

More than 250,000 organisations worldwide will this year begin the process of transitioning from the 2004 to the 2015 version of ISO 14001. An effective gap analysis can help those organisations to make the necessary changes.

Voting on the final draft (FDIS) of the revised standard for environment management systems (EMS) is expected to take place in July and August, with the new version published in September. After this, there will be a transition period, and organisations will have up to three years to make the necessary changes. Certification bodies, however, are likely to integrate the first 14001: 2015 audit with an organisation's next planned three-year recertification audit.

A change is to come

Most practitioners will know that the headline changes between the 2004 and 2015 versions of 14001 include: more alignment between an organisation's strategic direction and its environmental policy and objectives; a requirement to address the significant environmental issues associated with the lifecycle of products and services - but not to carry out a full lifecycle assessment; and a requirement to determine and address the risks associated with threats and opportunities.

However, if practitioners are to be properly prepared for the changes, they need to fully understand the precise meaning of the new requirements and compare them with their organisation's current practices. This will identify any gaps, and enable them to develop an action plan to implement any changes. It is best not to tackle this primarily as a compliance exercise. Rather, consider how the new topics could add value to, and increase the resilience of, the organisation's activities, products and services. It advisable to read around topics related to the requirements in 14001: 2015 and research examples of best practice in areas such as employee engagement, ecodesign and "cradle-to-cradle", using this activity as a springboard for innovation in the EMS.

The article in the August 2014 issue of the environmentalist discussed a number of the key changes between the existing 14001: 2004 and the then draft of the new standard. All of the issues highlighted were carried forward into the FDIS, although there has been some watering down of the requirements for strategic planning and the quality descriptors for communicated information, as well as changes to the terminology for risks, threats and opportunities.

The attached panels list the clauses that contain key changes in the FDIS, pose questions that practitioners can ask to conduct a gap analysis, and give examples of the typical evidence that they might use to demonstrate (and go beyond) compliance. Also included is the example of a small firm that supplies and fits domestic insulation products to illustrate how an organisation might approach some of the new clauses.


Marek Bidwell is director of Bidwell Management Systems and author of Making the transition to ISO 14001: 2015.


Transform articles

UK Emissions Trading Scheme ruled lawful

In Elliott-Smith v Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the claimant applied for judicial review of the legality of the defendants’ joint decision to create the UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK ETS) as a substitute for UK participation in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS).

30th July 2021

Read more

Thames Water has been fined £4m after untreated sewage escaped from sewers below London into a park and a river.

30th July 2021

Read more

None of England’s water and sewerage companies achieved all environmental expectations for the period 2015 to 2020, the Environment Agency has revealed. These targets included the reduction of total pollution incidents by at least one-third compared with 2012, and for incident self-reporting to be at least 75%.

30th July 2021

Read more

Global greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture are projected to increase by 4% over the next 10 years, despite the carbon intensity of production declining. That is according to a new report from the UN food agency and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which forecasts that 80% of the increase will come from livestock.

30th July 2021

Read more

Half of consumers worldwide now consider the sustainability of food and drink itself, not just its packaging, when buying, a survey of 14,000 shoppers across 18 countries has discovered. This suggests that their understanding of sustainability is evolving to include wellbeing and nutrition, with sustainable packaging now considered standard.

30th July 2021

Read more

Billions of people worldwide have been unable to access safe drinking water and sanitation in their homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a progress report from the World Health Organisation focusing on the UN’s sixth Sustainable Development Goal (SDG 6) – to “ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all by 2030”.

30th July 2021

Read more

New jobs that help drive the UK towards net-zero emissions are set to offer salaries that are almost one-third higher than those in carbon-intensive industries, research suggests.

5th July 2021

Read more

IEMA has today urged the UK government to focus on developing green skills and expertise across business, industry and civil society following the publication of an alarming report from the Climate Change Committee (CCC).

16th June 2021

Read more

The majority of UK consumers are willing to compromise on online purchases and delivery demands if it creates a more sustainable environment, new research suggests.

9th June 2021

Read more

Media enquires

Looking for an expert to speak at an event or comment on an item in the news?

Find an expert