Upper membership levels attract higher pay

9th March 2011


Author

IEMA

Full IEMA members (MIEMA) typically earn about £10,000 a year more than their affiliate counterparts, while associate members (AIEMA) earn, on average, £12,000 a year more than graduate members.

These are the headline findings from our latest pay survey, which was carried out between 23 December 2010 and 12 January 2011.

It also found that environmental professionals with full membership can expect to earn, on average, more than £50,000 a year.

These results reveal that the median salary – the mid-point in the range of respondents’ salaries – of an employed environmental professional of any membership level is £35,200. This compares favourably with the median for all UK employees, which in December 2010 was £25,900.

Our data also reveal that the median salary for a full member is £90,000.

Member earnings

Mean Median
Graduate £23,088 £23,000
Affiliate £38,868 £34,000
Associate £38,914 £35,000
Full £50,399 £90,000
Fellow £92,138 £45,000

The top 10% earn at least £60,030. The figures not only indicate that the average earnings of environmental practitioners have remained strong in the face of the economic downturn, but that the professional recognition gained from IEMA membership and qualifications is reflected in salaries.

Professional development is central to the progression of your career as well as your earnings; perhaps these salaries have motivated you to upgrade your membership?

IEMA is about to conduct a round of full membership upgrades but the registration closing date is Monday 1 March.

Or, if you do not feel ready for full membership but are interested in achieving AIEMA there are two rounds of the Associate Open Book Assessment between now and the end of 2011, giving you the opportunity to climb the membership ladder, enhance your professional recognition and maybe even increase your earnings.

Further results and a full analysis of the IEMA practitioners survey 2011 will be published in a special supplement accompanying the March issue of the environmentalist.


Transform articles

Cybercrime: A parallel pandemic

David Burrows reports on the rising tide of cybercrime, and explains why an increased focus on business’s social role could help solve the problem

23rd September 2021

Read more

How to Save Our Planet is call to action that aims to equip everyone with the knowledge needed to make change. We need to deal with climate change, environmental destruction and global poverty, and ensure everyone’s security.

23rd September 2021

Read more

Hannah Lesbirel and Beccy Wilson speak to IEMA members about climate anxiety

23rd September 2021

Read more

TED’s back catalogue contains dozens of fascinating insights into how we can preserve our planet.

23rd September 2021

Read more

Greg Webster speaks to Naresh Kumar about the potential of the FlyZero programme, which aims to deliver zero-carbon commercial aircraft

23rd September 2021

Read more

Seven of the UK's 17 key industry sectors are still increasing their emissions year-on-year, and most will miss their 2050 net-zero targets without significant government action, new research suggests.

23rd September 2021

Read more

Estelle Dehon offers her thoughts on the Environment Bill, environmental justice and the need for more thorough guidance on emissions. Simon Wicks asks the questions

23rd September 2021

Read more

Post-Brexit, the UK has the freedom to change its regulation of gene editing technology – and debate around the pros and cons of such a move is under way. Catherine Early reports

23rd September 2021

Read more

Given the proper investment and resources, the UK’s further education system can play a significant role in improving sustainability, argues Charlotte Bonner

23rd September 2021

Read more

Media enquires

Looking for an expert to speak at an event or comment on an item in the news?

Find an expert